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NCAB Decisions 2013

08/2013 | 05/2013

Decisions of the National Coal Ash Board (NCAB) 08/2013

At the meeting of the National Coal Ash Board held in August 2013, it was decided to continue research and development on the following subject:

  • Environment – Assimilation of LEAF in the environmental testing and assessment array for coal ash and its uses.
Assimilation of LEAF in the environmental testing and assessment array for coal ash and its uses Assimilation of up to date USEPA methods for the testing of coal ash leaching, by-products and their applications. Establishment of a data management system as part of the activities to adopt LEAF as the framework for environmental assessment of coal ash uses. To be conducted by an inter-disciplinary team lead by Dr. Nadya Teutsch from the Geological Survey.
 
Brief description of the Work
LEAF (Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework) is the basis for assessment of environmental impact caused by leachings from a wide range of materials and products. It includes four, up to date leaching methods tested, approved and currently used by the USEPA. These methods are designed to provide good approximation of how materials can be expected to behave during processes under different environmental conditions. The testing array developed was headed by Professor David Kosson from Vanderbilt University in Tennessee, USA in cooperation with Dr. Hans Van der Sloot, from the ECN Institute in Holland and other research group along with USEPA involvement and support.The work program is essentially an infrastructure investment with a long term view and includes the following four principal tasks.

  • Assimilation of LEAF and up to date USEPA test methods into the environmental testing and
    assessment array for coal ash in Israel, which has been conducted for many years by the Geological Survey.
  • Definition of environmental limitations for the use of coal ash in concrete and cement products for infrastructures.
  • Environmental testing for agricultural applications of coal ash.
  • Development of a structured framework for environmental decision making regarding the uses of coal ash in Israel’s unique conditions.

Initially, the work will focus on the first task – establishment of the data management and assessment array – LeachXS. Familiarity of the new USEPA testing methods.
 
To read a more detailed description of the research, click here

Decisions of the National Coal Ash Board (NCAB) 05/2013

At the meeting of the National Coal Ash Board held in May 2013, it was decided to continue research and development in the following field:

  • Agriculture – Cost/benefit analysis for the uses of coal ash in agriculture.
Agriculture- Cost/benefit analysis for the uses of coal ash in agriculture An economic assessment, executed by a team headed by Dr. Efrat Hadas, Director of the Economics Division at the Agricultural Investments Administration and comprised of researchers at the Volcani Center and Ministry of Agriculture Extension Officers is in progress.
 
Brief description of the research
Ever since the NCAB was founded, the use of coal ash in agricultural applications has been examined as one of the principal ways to ensure the beneficial use of coal ash.The first effort at agro technical characterization of bottom ash (coarse ash after screening) as a growth medium compared with tuff, were conducted for the NCAB by the Haifa Technion in 1997 and they were followed by extensive research efforts at the Faculty of Agriculture, Hebrew University Jerusalem and field trials.From 2000, the NCAB has promoted the use of bottom ash (mostly fine ash after screening) as animal bedding (principally for cattle).Starting in 2001 and with help from researchers at the Volcani Center’s Institute of Soil, Water and Environment Sciences, the NCAB began investigating and developing the use of fly ash for improving and conserving agricultural soils, both by direct application and through the use of fly ash for stabilizing sludges by applying the N-Viro technology to Shafdan sewage sludge.

After several years of research and development, the next logical step is to assess the overall benefits to the economy accrued from using of coal ash for agricultural applications in order to assess their usefulness as a significant alternative to other, conservative uses in the fields of civil engineering.
 
To read a more detailed description of that research, click here