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NCAB Decisions 2014

03/2014

Decisions of the National Coal Ash Board (NCAB) 03/2014

At the meeting of the National Coal Ash Board on March 2014, it was decided to continue moving forward with research and development on the following subject:

  • Environment – Establishment of the standard use of LEAF for the environmental assessment of fly ash used in agriculture.
Establishment of the standard use of LEAF for the environmental assessment of fly ash used in agriculture Performance of the standard assessment of the risks associated with the application of fly ash to agricultural land – The movement of polluting microelements leached from the ash into the soil and groundwater and their uptake by plants. Execution by an inter-disciplinary team headed by Dr. Nadya Teutsch from the Geological Survey of Israel.
 
Brief description of the Work
This research will examine the behavior of fly ash applied directly to the soil as an additive for the improvement of soil structure and as a constituent of sewage sludge stabilized with lime and fly ash, used as a fertilizer and a disease control agent.LEAF – The Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework, is used to assess the environmental effects caused by the leaching of polluting constituents from a wide variety of materials. LEAF incorporates four of the USEPA’s modern leaching tests, which provide a good approximation of the behavior to be expected from materials during their exposure to different environmental conditions. The LEAF system was developed by Professor David Kosson from Vanderbilt University, Tennessee, USA and Dr. Hans van der Sloot, from the ECN Institute in Holland, with involvement and support from the USEPA.In the summer of 2013, the Coal Ash Board began executing the first task of the project – The assimilation of the LEAF Program in the process of organizing a basic data base on coal ash.

The outcome of this stage of the research will be the integration into the LEAF model the information accumulated regarding the behavior of fly ash applied directly to soil as an additive for the improvement of the soil’s structure and as a component of sewage sludge stabilized with lime and fly ash, which is used as a fertilizer and as a disease control agent.
 
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